European Union

Towards a multilingual world: the future of the English language in the 21st Century

by Carolina Herranz-Carr  Carolina is an Account Executive at East Creative Agency, a voice-over artist in English and Spanish and a graduate from Brunel University. Her passion for languages comes from her bilingual background. To share a common language and a cultural aptitude are well-known determinants of trade, a belief long held by successful businesses in their international marketing campaigns and trade negotiations. With the far-reaching postcolonial spread of the English language and US dominance in the Western hemisphere, international trade, global politics and cultural interactions soon adopted English as the common ‘lingua franca’, whilst Russian dominated Eastern Europe and French most of Western Africa. This phenomenon accelerated the globalised world of today and created several cultural spheres of influence where none existed before and strengthening older links in some cases. However, in the face of an unsettled post-Brexit anxiety, a perceived void in US global leadership, and China’s entering in the big league […]

Translation Technologies at LocWorld (Part 1: Moses)

by Manuel Herranz I attended Localization World London both as a guest speaker on what I call an upsurge in machine translation, almost a “transition frenzy” towards post-editing “future stability” within the EU-sponsored MosesCore project, organized by TAUS, and as an exhibitor of PangeaMT’s DIY SMT machine translation technologies. The session formed part of the Pre-Conference Day and it was a lively session with plenty of Q&A from attendees, reflecting the high interest MT has stirred among translation users and practitioners nowadays. Prof. Hieu Hoang provided a general introduction to what an SMT system is as translation technology, as well as what translation and language models are. The distinction between a translation model and, probabilities of phrases to figure out how the output sentence is grammatically correct, proper re-ordered, etc. Prof. Hoang related the story of how he originally updated Pharaoh to replace Moses and now only maintains it, as […]

For Europe, no (new) CAT tool is good enough

by Manuel Herranz And why should it be? Decisions coming from Brussels tend to be misunderstood, shallowly analyzed or directly criticized whichever way the wind blows. Let us remember 2010’s first ever report on the Size of the Translation Industry in Europe, which was a very comprehensive view of the current status, country by country, and facts and figures into several areas, even if revenues could only take into account certain activities. It also contained words and forecasts from personalities in the industry. Liking reports is like choosing a favorite color – everyone has one liking. Nevertheless, it set detailed information where there was none. However, the decision not to award the contract to any CAT tool in the market points to a very clear state-of-affairs in the language industry: despite massive innovations in computing (from open cloud to internal or managed clouds: Eucalyptus (built on Amazon EC2), OpenNebula, the […]

Comment to SDL’s “Sharing Data between Companies – is it the Holy Grail?”

by Manuel Herranz Eye openers about data sharing (or data mixing) abound nowadays. The kick start for TM leveraging, automation and faster solutions has come from outside our beloved language industry in the shape of – algorithms that create language (SMT) and their application/business by players inside and outside the industry (from Google Translate to new MT entrants and offsprings) – a credit crunch and a financial crisis that is leading companies to rethink the unthinkable A few times (exceptions) language professionals have joined to actually innovate and come up with something really new, mostly crowdsourcing, in translation, in frameworks, in workflows. Never mind, it is seldom the norm that busy people have the time to innovate. It takes a shot from outside a particular industry to shake the foundations or to force to change things. (Let’s assume from a positivist point of view that change is for the better). […]